Ajax Diner Book Club 4/27/15 KRFC Ft. Collins CO

Jon Dee Graham “Beautifully Broken” from Not As Bad As It Looks

J. Roddy Walston & The Business “Marigold” from Essential Tremors

Blue Blood “This Is The Life” from This Is The Life

Cafeteria “Gorgeous Friend” from Knee Deep

James McMurtry “These Things I’ve Come to Know” from Complicated Game

Spirit Family Reunion “All the Way Back Home” from Hands Together

Slim Cessna’s Auto Club “No doubt about it” from Unentitled

Low Anthem “Cage The Songbird” from Oh My God Charlie Darwin

Mississippi John Hurt “I Shall Not Moved” from Best of Mississippi John Hurt

John Moreland “Cherokee” from High On Tulsa Heat

Kris Kristofferson “Me And Bobbie McGhee” from Live From Austin TX

Scott H. Biram “I’m Troubled” from Nothin’ But Blood

Arlo McKinley & The Lonesome Sound “Just Like The Rest” from Arlo McKinley & The Lonesome Sound

Townes Van Zandt “No Place To Fall” from Be Here To Love Me

Drag the River “Here’s to the Losers” from Drag The River

Big Mama Thornton “Cotton Picking Blues”

Supremes “Having A Party” from Sings Sam Cooke

Howlin’ Wolf “spoonful” from His Best

Patti Smith “break It Up” from Horses

Courtney Barnett “An Illustration Of Loneliness” from Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit

Sour Boy Bitter Girl “Flowers” from The Days After The Fire

Meat Puppets “Good Golly Miss Molly” from Out My Way

Brown Bird “Sackcloth and Ash” from Axis Mundi

Elmore James “Ice Cream Man” from Blues Masters: The Best of Elmore James

Two Cow Garage “Soundtrack to My Summer” from Sweet Saint Me

Replacements “Shooting Dirty Pool” from Pleased to Meet Me

 

Playlist – Ajax Diner Book Club 7/28/14 KRFC Ft. Collins CO

I took last week off from the podcast but I tried to come back with a strong and diverse mix of songs that will make you think, dance, smile and cry. Let me know if it worked.

Iron & Wine “Upward Over The Mountains” from The Creek Drank the Cradle

The Low Anthem “Apothecary Love” from Smart Flesh

Townes Van Zandt “My Proud Mountains” from Our Mother The Mountain

Hooten Hallers “One More Heavy Mile” from Chillicothe Fireball

Sharon Jones and The Dap Kings “100 Days 100 Nights” from 100 Days 100 Nights

Black Joe Lewis  “Come To My Party” from Electric Slave

Alabama Shakes “Hold On” from Alabama Shakes EP

Cory Branan “Meantime Blues” from No Hit Wonder

Blue Mountain “Mountain Girl” from Dog Days

Kierston White “Alcohol” from Don’t Write Love Songs

Uncle Tupelo “I Got Drunk” from 89/93 An Anthology

Billy Joe Shaver “The Git Go” from Long In the Tooth

Caleb Caudle “Missing Holidays” from Paint Another Layer On My Heart

GUEST POST: 3 ALBUMS FROM OTIS GIBBS:

Note from AIV: Otis approached me about this post and I thought it was a great idea and I hope to make it a reoccurring piece here on 9B. Hope you enjoy.


As a traveling musician, I’m given countless CDs from people I meet on the road. I have no interest in being a music critic, but I try my best to listen to as many as I can. In the spirit of turning people on to good music, this is a list of three records that stand out from the crowd.

Thanks for giving a damn,
Otis Gibbs

ADAM CARROLL


I met Adam a few years ago at a festival in Colorado. I was booked to do a songwriters round with Adam and Tim Easton. At the time, Tim and I had never heard of Adam, but we were completely blown away. Later that night, Adam and I hung out and he gave me this record. Since then, Adam has become one of my favorite songwriters and has released quite a few wonderful albums. I think this album is a great starting point and it’s one that I keep coming back to time and again. If you search around on Youtube you can find people like Slaid Cleaves and Hayes Carll covering Adam’s songs. Recommended if you like Guy Clark, Robert Earl Keen, Townes Van Zandt.

Adam Carroll – Erroll’s Song

JASON EKLUND


Jason and I met while we were playing a hobo gathering in La Crosse, Wisconsin. After the gig, he handed me a CD-R that he’d written his name and album title on with black marker. My best buddy Todd and I drove home to Indianapolis after the gig and listened to this album 3 times straight through. I found out a few years later that the record was produced by Gurf Morlix and had guest appearances by Rick Richards, Guy Forsyth, Carolyn Wonderland and Slaid Cleaves (just to name a few). I did a quick Google search and wasn’t able to find anywhere to buy this record online. I’m hoping that you’ll be able to hunt it down, because it’s well worth the effort. Recommended if you like John Prine, Woody Guthrie.

Jason Eklund – Farmer Ain’t The Man

CHET O’KEEFE


A mutual friend took Amy and I to a dive bar in Nashville (Brown’s Diner) to see Chet. I was instantly a fan. I loved his voice, his guitar playing and his writing immediately. This record was recorded and produced by my buddy Thomm Jutz, and it showcases Chet at his finest. Chet recently toured Ireland with Nanci Griffith and was awarded “Song Of The Year” in 2010 by the International Bluegrass Music Association (beating out Guy Clark and Bill Monroe). Recommended if you like John Prine, Bob Dylan, Blaze Foley. (AIV Note: We have a full 9B piece on Chet’s album planned for the near future.)

Chet O’Keefe – Game Bird

RYAN BINGHAM & THE DEAD HORSES – JUNKY STAR

JUNKY STAR

While a lot of folks bill this kid as being in the same genre as folks like Stoney LaRue, Cross Canadian Ragweed, Max Stalling, et al. it is my opinion that he’s not. Now mind you, I hadn’t heard a lot of his stuff before Junky Star but what I had heard I wouldn’t have classified as Red Dirt which is probably why I hadn’t actually checked out more of his stuff. I got this album from a friend of mine and it sat un-listened to and gathering dust until a few weeks ago when I was digging through my stack of stuff to check out when I have time. I dropped it on my mp3 player and didn’t pay much attention to be honest. I didn’t pay much attention until I started hearing these tracks I had never heard before coming up in my random playlist that were good enough I had to look and see who it was. After realizing I had made a mistake not checking out Ryan much earlier I listened to the album all the way through and was happily surprised. As I eluded to before quite a few people throw Ryan Bingham in to the Texas Country heap with all the others but I think he is much more than that. Now you all know I love my Red Dirt Music but this kid transcends any genre you could try and pigeonhole him in to.

Junky Star is honestly hard for me to describe. It’s got a lot of folk feel to it but it has a drawl in the music itself that identifies it as decidedly Texas without having a steel guitar and twang to every track. This one feels like it has been flayed and laid open for all to see. The songwriting is deep and and attacks the stories within the songs from a perspective most folks would consider. “Hallelujah” takes the love song and lets you see it from the perspective a newly lover wanting to come back to the love of his life and refusing to accept death while “All Choked Up Again” is a ballad of patricide and a lover loving unconditionally. I keep feeling like there’s a hint of Dylan somewhere in the lyrics along with a generous portion of Townes Van Zandt but I also feel like that doesn’t really give Ryan enough credit. It’s all well and good to see some of the influences but I have to stress that Ryan’s work is his own and he’s not just a couple of, albeit amazing, songwriters that may have influenced him. The depth runs through every song on this album as does the gravel in his voice. Like so many of my favorite albums this one makes me want to drink whiskey but this one makes me want to do it alone in the dark where I can confront myself just a little bit.

Calling Ryan a country singer doesn’t cover it; as far as I am concerned this boy is a straight up troubadour and while the music itself might not be your thing if you don’t bother listening to this one you are missing out on some of the best songwriting out there these days. I personally like the stripped down feel that this album has compared to a lot of my favorite music these days. It’s a refreshing break even if a little paradoxical as it is also darker, musically, than most of the stuff that grabs my attention these days. After tossing it aside, letting it stay on random for weeks and finally giving it the listen it deserved I have no choice but qualify Junky Star as Essential Listening!

Ryan Bingham & The Dead Horses – All Choked Up Again
Ryan Bingham & The Dead Horses – Hallelujah
Ryan Bingham & The Dead Horses – Lay My Head On The Rail

Ryan Bignham & The Dead Horses’ official website
Ryan Bingham & The Dead Horses on last.fm
Ryan Bingham & The Dead Horses on Facebook

SUBURBAN HOME RECORD’S MIXTAPE Vol. 5 READY FOR FREE CONSUMPTION:


Virgil and Co. released their latest mixtape earlier this week. This volume was inspired by the upcoming release of the NEW I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In The House album, The Sounds Of Dying. This album (hopefully) marks the triumphant return of ICLASOB as a band after a couple of years on hiatus. The album was officially released for preorder today and if you preorder it you get an immediate mp3 download of the complete album. Trust me, I’ve had the album for a few months now….it’s fucking fantastic and you should stop reading this post right now, open a new tab and buy it. Regrets, you’ll have none. Anyhow, the compilation features selected tracks from the Suburban Home roster, including a new demo from one Mr. Austin Lucas. They also accepted submissions from outside sources for this album which accounts for seven of the tracks.

The album is available for free and legal download here. The folks over at SH only ask that if you download it you send the link to 4 of your friends (or tweet about it or spread the word in some manner) which I think is a fair trade off.

If you want to print them out the covers are available here: Cover / Back

Track Listing:

  1. I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House – Swear To God
  2. I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In the House – Postcards And Apologies (Two Cow Garage)
  3. Two Cow Garage – Postcards and Apologies
  4. Michael Dean Damron – Waiting Around To Die (Townes Van Zandt)
  5. Townes Van Zandt – Waiting Around To Die
  6. Austin Lucas – Sleep Well (Demo)
  7. Trampled By Turtles – Wait So Long
  8. Oblio’s Arrow – End of the Burning Moon
  9. Tim Barry – Exit Wounds
  10. Slobberbone – Placemat Blues
  11. John Moreland & the Black Gold Band – Bastards Of The Highway
  12. Jeff Rowe – Kate
  13. The Replacements – Unsatisfied
  14. Jon Snodgrass – Fast in Last
  15. Arliss Nancy – Stella Lovely
  16. Jr. Juggernaut – Another Two Weeks
  17. Alexander Hudjohn – Down So Low
  18. Calling Morocco – Break Your Heart
  19. Tin Horn Prayer – Louis Collins
  20. Jared Grabb – Devil Between
  21. Lucky Old Sun – Back In Style
  22. Armchair Martian – …not fine. demo
  23. The Takers – Drift
  24. Look Mexico – Take It Upstairs, Einstein
  25. Geraldine Fibbers – Lilybelle
  26. Pariah Beat – Elvis in Jerusulum
  27. Drag the River – Beautiful & Damned
  28. BEERS – I Love You (But I Don’t Trust You)
  29. The Evening Rig – Half Asleep
  30. Hank Williams Jr. – If You Don’t Like Hank Williams

BLAZE FOLEY: THE MUSIC YOU MIGHTA MADE

“There’s kind of two Blazes. A lot of people saw one or the other. There was the wild one. . . . And then there was the gentle, loving, caring one. I got to know both.” ~ Townes Van Zandt

Over the years of doing ninebullets, I’ve had the occasional emailer ask me if I’d ever heard of Blaze Foley. One was even so kind as to email me a collection of Blaze’s songs. These emails were the first I’d ever heard of the man, but it’s been in the back of my mind to write about him ever since I got those songs.

Blaze Foley was born in Arkansas but grew up in Texas settling on Austin as his home in his adult life. Even for a city known for it’s characters, Blaze seems to have been in a class all his own. Once, in an effort to mock the “Urban Cowboy” fad and their silver-tipped cowboy boots, he started putting duct tape on the tips of his boots. This obsession kept growing until he’d made a complete suit from duct tape that he would wear around. When they buried him, his friends even covered his entire casket with duct tape.

At the age of 39, Foley was murdered while attempting to help his friend Concho January defend himself from his violent son, Carey. Despite having written hundreds of songs and recorded numerous albums at the time of his death, none of Blaze’s music had ever been released. One album’s masters were seized by the DEA when the executive producer was caught in a drug bust. Another album’s masters were stolen when the station wagon Blaze was living in was broken into, and another album, “Wanted More Dead Than Alive”, was believed lost until an old friend found some master tapes while cleaning out his car some years after Blaze’s death.  Despite having a small but rabid fanbase that included such luminaries as Gurf Morlix and Townes Van Zandt, it would take some 10 years after his death before a Blaze album would see the light of day. The late nineties/naughts have given us a small Blaze Foley revival of sorts, with 4 albums being released (with a fifth on the way), an equal amount of tribute albums, and two documentaries about the man who never saw his music leave the bars he played in. A number of his songs have become hits for other artists, including Merle Haggard’s cover of “If I Could Fly”, Lyle Lovette’s cover of “Election Day”, and John Prine’s cover of “Clay Pigeons” off his 2005 Grammy Award winning album, Fair and Square.

There are plenty of other sites out there that can offer you a much more complete and better written account of Blaze’s life. I was only hoping to introduce you to / raise some interest in this lost gem. When I listen to his music, I can’t help but to think how appropriately titled Gurf Morlix’s tribute to Blaze from his 2009 album Last Exit To Happyland was with “Music You Mighta Made.”

Blaze Foley – Cold, Cold World
Blaze Foley – Big Cheeseburgers & Good French Fries
Blaze Foley – Darlin’
Blaze Foley – Officer Norris
Blaze Foley – Gettin’ Over You

Gurf Morlix – Music You Might Have Made

Lyle Lovette – Election Day
Merle Haggard – If I Could Fly
John Prine – Clay Pigeons

ROBERT EARL KEEN – THE ROSE HOTEL


The first time I ever heard anything referred to as Texas Country it was a song from Robert Earl Keen. That song, unlike many people’s first REK exposure (The Road Goes on Forever), was Corpus Christi Bay. My younger brother played it for me one evening and I was hooked. I speedily acquired REK’s catalog and branched out into other Texas Country artists like Cory Morrow, Pat Green, Jason Boland & The Stragglers just to name a few. I love the Texas Country scene and especially The Firehouse Saloon here in Houston. When I finally got into the music REK was too big a name to be playing the dives I tend to hang out in so I rarely see him play and yet he his music holds a special place in my heart. It may be that he was the first artist in a new genre that I heard but it is more likely that he is just an amazing singer/songwriter.

After a four year hiatus we finally have a new release from Robert Earl Keen. The Rose Hotel may be standard Robert Earl Keen but that doesn’t mean there is anything standard about the album. You see standard Robert Earl Keen is a cut above the rest even when it comes to Texas Country. I have been listening to this thing for two days now and haven’t found a single song I didn’t like. From the opening strokes of The Rose Hotel to the closing chords of Wireless in Heaven this is a solid album. Toss in some a Townes Van Zandt cover Flying Shoes and Billy Bob Thorton doing vocals on 10,000 Chinese Walk Into A Bar and you end up with something great. Fifteen albums into his career Robert Earl Keen proves once again that there is no mold that fits him and that suits us just fine.

If you aren’t already a Robert Earl Keen fan you should be. Give the 9b selections a listen and go get yourself REK’d…

Robert Earl Keen – The Rose Hotel
Robert Earl Keen – Throwin’ Rocks
Robert Earl Keen – The Man Behind The Drums

Robert Earl Keen’s Official Website, Robert Earl Keen on myspace, Buy The Rose Hotel

STEVE EARLE – TOWNES

Admittedly, I’m not really a fan of Steve Earle, outside of his role as Waylon, Bubble’s N.A. sponsor, on the greatest television series ever, The Wire. So when Steve Earle’s newest album, Townes, arrived in my inbox I wasn’t expecting too much.

Townes is a tribute album to one of Steve’s greatest musical inspirations, Townes Van Zandt. There will be plenty of other far more knowledgeable publications writing about this album in the coming days/weeks, so I’ll leave the stories to them. I wanted to write about this album only to tell you that I am not a Steve Earle fan at all and I love it. The reverence that Steve brings to the songs is palpable. You’d almost have to be dead not to like this album.

Check it out.

Steve Earle – Poncho and Lefty
Steve Earle – Lungs
Steve Earle – Marie

Steve Earle – Way Down In The Hole (theme song from The Wire)

Steve Earle’s Official Site, Steve Earle on myspace, Buy Townes

MICHAEL DEAN DAMRON – FATHER'S DAY

This is Michael’s third album w/o his former Portland, Oregon bandmates, I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In The House. His first cd, A Perfect Day For A Funeral, was a toned down exceptionally personal affair, while his second, Bad Days Ahead, was more of a midway point between ICLASOB and A Perfect Day For A Funeral. The two left me wondering where Michael was gonna go with his solo career.

Lucky for me the answer was a descent back to the calmer, quieter, more introspective, personal version of Michael Dean Damron, and the result is a total home run. The problems with the equalization/mix that seemed to plague Bad Days Ahead are gone and the biting songwriting is back, giving us a beautiful blend of country, folk, blues, and rock music that highlights the more emotional side of Damron.

Among the 14 tracks there is a cover of 9b faves, Drag the River. A cover of the Thin Lizzy track “Dancing In The Moon Light” (also oft covered by Drag the River) is here, too, as well as Damron’s take on the Townes Van Zandt track “Waiting To Die”. Despite the well-rounded selection of covers, the real standouts on the album are Michael’s originals. Whether is be the sentimental title track “Fathers Day” or the get fucked attitude of “Boy With A Car”, Michael always seems to shine when he is blazing his own path. While some people seem to pine for the bombastic Southern-rock sounds of Mike’s former band, I find the solo Michael Dean Damron sound to be Essential Listening.

Michael Dean Damron – Boy With A Car
Michael Dean Damron – Waiting Around To Die
Michael Dean Damron – Dancin’ In The Moonlight

Michael Dean Damron’s Official Site, Michael Dean Damron on myspace, Buy Father’s Day