TOP FIVE — SONGS ABOUT FOOD

Or at least tangentially about food. And like all good lists this one goes, in alphabetical order, to 11.
  1. The Band – “Home Cookin'” from A Musical History. A 1976 outtake, this is Rick Danko near his vulnerable best.
  2. Carolyn Mark & the New Best Friends – “Yanksgiving” from The Pros and Cons of Collaboration. Cooking to this song is tons of fun, but also guaranteed to make you wish that you were at Carolyn Mark’s party instead.
  3. Descendents – “Weinerschnitzel” from Fat EP. Good advice re: bull sperm.
  4. Guy Clark – “Texas Cookin'” from Texas Cookin’. He also wrote “Home Grown Tomatoes,” which is going to be the anthem of my forthcoming Summer of the Caprese Salad.
  5. John Mellencamp – “Hot Dogs and Hamburgers” from The Lonesome Jubilee. The American version of Leatherface’s “Baked Potato” (see below).
  6. Leatherface – “Baked Potato” from Mush. The British version of John Mellencamp’s “Hot Dogs and Hamburgers” (see above).
  7. Parallel 5th – “Carrots and Peas” from The Living Room Compilation. They were a Rhode Island new wave band that hardly mattered, but this song is funny and takes the place of The Beach Boys’ “Vegetables” which is on every other list of best food songs on the interwebs.
  8. Patty Griffin – “Making Pies” from 1000 Kisses. This is the best written song on this list. And Guy Clark is on this list. Good god, this song.
  9. Robert Earl Keen & Lyle Lovett – “Front Porch Song” from Keen’s No Kinda Dancer and Lovett’s Lyle Lovett. In addition to the much acknowledged steaming greasy plates of enchiladas, also consider the pimento cheese sandwiches that inspired the fourth verse.
  10. Steve Goodman – “The Vegetable Song” from Somebody Else’s Troubles. Most underrated songwriter on this list. And Guy Clark is on this list.
  11. Tom Waits – “Eggs and Sausage (in a Cadillac with Susan Michelson)” from Nighthawks at the Diner. *rhythmic snap*

We’re well aware that this site takes its name from a song on an album called Pizza Deliverance and offers sporadic taco recipes, and know you know that I, personally, am always starving. What do y’all got in the pantry? Food songs! Deliver them.

GUEST POST: 3 ALBUMS FROM OTIS GIBBS:

Note from AIV: Otis approached me about this post and I thought it was a great idea and I hope to make it a reoccurring piece here on 9B. Hope you enjoy.


As a traveling musician, I’m given countless CDs from people I meet on the road. I have no interest in being a music critic, but I try my best to listen to as many as I can. In the spirit of turning people on to good music, this is a list of three records that stand out from the crowd.

Thanks for giving a damn,
Otis Gibbs

ADAM CARROLL


I met Adam a few years ago at a festival in Colorado. I was booked to do a songwriters round with Adam and Tim Easton. At the time, Tim and I had never heard of Adam, but we were completely blown away. Later that night, Adam and I hung out and he gave me this record. Since then, Adam has become one of my favorite songwriters and has released quite a few wonderful albums. I think this album is a great starting point and it’s one that I keep coming back to time and again. If you search around on Youtube you can find people like Slaid Cleaves and Hayes Carll covering Adam’s songs. Recommended if you like Guy Clark, Robert Earl Keen, Townes Van Zandt.

Adam Carroll – Erroll’s Song

JASON EKLUND


Jason and I met while we were playing a hobo gathering in La Crosse, Wisconsin. After the gig, he handed me a CD-R that he’d written his name and album title on with black marker. My best buddy Todd and I drove home to Indianapolis after the gig and listened to this album 3 times straight through. I found out a few years later that the record was produced by Gurf Morlix and had guest appearances by Rick Richards, Guy Forsyth, Carolyn Wonderland and Slaid Cleaves (just to name a few). I did a quick Google search and wasn’t able to find anywhere to buy this record online. I’m hoping that you’ll be able to hunt it down, because it’s well worth the effort. Recommended if you like John Prine, Woody Guthrie.

Jason Eklund – Farmer Ain’t The Man

CHET O’KEEFE


A mutual friend took Amy and I to a dive bar in Nashville (Brown’s Diner) to see Chet. I was instantly a fan. I loved his voice, his guitar playing and his writing immediately. This record was recorded and produced by my buddy Thomm Jutz, and it showcases Chet at his finest. Chet recently toured Ireland with Nanci Griffith and was awarded “Song Of The Year” in 2010 by the International Bluegrass Music Association (beating out Guy Clark and Bill Monroe). Recommended if you like John Prine, Bob Dylan, Blaze Foley. (AIV Note: We have a full 9B piece on Chet’s album planned for the near future.)

Chet O’Keefe – Game Bird

MIC HARRISON AND THE HIGH SCORE – GREAT COMMOTION


Mic Harrison and the High Score are one of those bands that I rarely listen to but every time I do I wonder why I’m not listening to more of them. My good buddy Larry turned me on to them a couple of years back when they released their third album, Push Me On Home. At the time I said they remided me “of a rawer, more rocking and less sober version of Robert Earl Keene”, and I think that description still fits them pretty well. Really, Great Commotion is everything that ninebullets is about. A record with enough twang and jangle in it that the kids don’t like it, but too much rock and roll for a Sunday morning.

Give it a listen.

Mic Harrison and the High Score – I’m Still Lost
Mic Harrison and the High Score – Talk To You Tonight
Mic Harrison and the High Score – Interstate Wall

Mic Harrison and the High Score’s Official Site, Mic Harrison and the High Score on Facebook, Buy Great Commotion

CROSS CANADIAN RAGWEED – TIME TO SAY GOODBYE

Cross Canadian Ragweed

On October 24, 2010 Cross Canadian Ragweed played their final show. They rocked a sell out crowd at Joe’s in Chicago to close out a tour during which they announced that the band would be taking a hiatus. I was pretty damn disappointed because after all my love for these boys and all the shows I go to I never got to see them play live. Something always seemed to come up. Aside from my disappointment this final shows signals the end of an era. Cross Canadian Ragweed have been the unofficial poster boys for the Texas Country scene and the a large part of the reason that the music from that scene is pretty much now known as Red Dirt Music. In a genre with folks like Jason Boland, Robert Earl Keen and Billy Joe Shaver these upstarts rose up through the ranks and took the mantle! For better than a decade they have been making amazing music and I can honestly say that every single one of their albums qualifies as Essential Listening.

It is with a heavy heart that I pen this little piece to say goodbye to one of my favorite bands of all time. Their reasons for breaking up the band are posted all over the web so I won’t bother re-posting them or opining on their validity. These kids have been a heavy part of my whiskey drinking playlist since I first heard Carney Man in 1999 and I own everything they’ve released since. This is one of those bands that if I had ever got to see them I would have frankly been in awe and lost all ability to do an interview or anything. I love this band and the fact that they are breaking up, even if it turns out to be temporary, if heartbreaking. But instead of carrying on I’ll just post you a little link of a bootleg of their final show and give you a couple of tracks to listen to while you download.

I also just realized I never did an Intro/Primer for these boys. I guess that’ll be next on my plate…

(This didn’t have a cover when I grabbed it so I hacked this one together in a couple of minutes)

TIme To Move On

01 – Introduction
02 – Mexican Sky
03 – Cold Hearted Woman
04 – Deal
05 – Dimebag
06 – Sick and Tired (with Lee Ann Womack)
07 – To Find My Love
08 – Lonely Girl
09 – Constantly
10 – Hammer Down
11 – Soul Agent
12 – Anywhere But Here
13 – In Oklahoma (With Stoney LaRue)
14 – Drum Solo
15 – Number
16 – Daddy’s At Home
17 – On a Cloud
18 – Travelin’ Kind (Stoney LaRue)
19 – Blind Man (Stoney LaRue)
20 – Broken
21 – Blue Bonnets
22 – Dead Man
23 – Brooklyn Kid
24 – Don’t Need You
25 – Time to Move on
26 – Boys From Oklahoma
27 – Changes (Seth James)
28 – Late Last Night
29 – Carney Man
30 – Rockin’ In The Free World

Cross Canadian Ragweed – Time To Move On: The Final Show

THE ROCK REPORT: JEREMY STEDING AND THE BAND OF BASTARDS @ GOODE'S ARMADILLO PALACE – HOUSTON, TEXAS 12-03-09

Some days things just work together. While I was writing up the review of A Damn Good Ride I dropped by Jeremy Steding’s website to look for his bio and such and found out he was playing in town that night. I grabbed a phone number off the site, made a call, and set up some time with him before the show. As luck would have it and one thing leading to another I wasn’t as early as I wanted to be but since it was a Thursday night show there wasn’t an opening act and there was still plenty of time to meet The Band of Bastards and get to know them before the show. And a damn fine show it was…

Jeremy Steding
(In case you’re wondering that is a Jason Isbell shirt on the Eric.)

What I learned is a that Jeremy is originally from Florida and came west to Austin in 2007 with an unmastered, unreleased “Whiskey Songs and Prison Songs” to pursue music in the Red Dirt scene. Having been inspired by old Pat Green (before he went Nashville), Cory Morrow, Robert Earl Keen and the like he figure Austin was the place to be if he wanted to play his kind of music.
I know our gracious host would disagree, being a huge fan of the Florida music scene and rightfully so, but Jeremy made his trek and is now making his mark on Red Dirt Music. One of the highlights of the night was finding out that Jeremy is fan and friend of Pete and Larry from Truckstop Coffee. Those boys are perennial 9B favourites and it’s always nice to find other fans.

Jeremy is at a point in his career that he says many never make it past. He’s playing decent venues and getting decent turnouts but intimates it’s fairly easy to get stuck there for a good long while and some folks can’t handle what seems like being in a rut. He handles most of his own booking, all of his merch, all of the publicity pretty much managing himself and the Band of Bastards. He uses all of the standard methods today such as twitter, myspace, facebook, and so on to get the word out about his music and his shows all while giving away his recorded music on his website. He and the band have a sponorship from Budweiser and they are touring hard. He says he loves the work and doesn’t mind all the time it takes to self manage. I did ask him specifically about giving away the albums on the website and he explained that while they sell a good number of CDs at shows that he wanted more people to discover his music. He thinks that people don’t buy as many CDs as they used to because of worrying about the investment. What if the CD sucks? So he put both albums for free, gives out business cards everywhere he goes that tell people where to go to download it, has a donate button if you want to toss a couple bucks his way, and still sells just as many plastic shiny discs at shows. And it’s working. More and more people are hearing his music and coming to shows. And that’s where Jeremy Steding and the Band of Bastards really shine…

Jeremy Steding And let me tell you: These boys can tear up a stage. I liked the album and that’s pretty clear from my review but seeing them live is just damn good. It’s not as big a difference as Cory Branan’s live vs. his studio work but it is something that has to be seen to be believed. Jeremy is a showman for sure and he pulls in the audience without even trying. He’s still young so the show isn’t as polished as some of the old timers but whether it’s belting out his original songs are having a little fun with classic covers like You Never Call Be By My Name whilst claiming it was written by “…a friend of a friend of a friend of my dad’s” on Canadian bacon in eyeliner you can tell that Jeremy is doing what he loves and the Band of Bastards is having as much fun as he is. And when I say he gets the audience involved I mean the isn’t above calling out the drunk birthday girl to help out with The Boys From Oklahoma.

They're too damn skinny and way too long...
…they’re too damn skinny and way too long…

In closing you shouldn’t miss the chance to see this Florida boy turned Texan play a live show. With a band that cites influences ranging from Truckstop Coffee to Jason Isbell you certainly could do worse. And as far as the more country and western shows go I am not sure you could do better these days.

The Band of Bastards is:

  • Matt Winegardner – Drums
  • Eric Smith – Bass
  • Steve James – Lead Guitar

You can see the full gallery from the show over at romeosidvicious.com .

Here’s some tracks off of Jemery’s first album since I don’t have any live tracks (except the one from this album) from him just yet:

Jeremy Steding – Bonnie Blue
Jeremy Steding – Auburn
Jeremy Steding – The Day to Day, Today (Live)

And the Boys From Oklahoma…

Jason Boland – The Boys From Oklahoma

Jeremy Steding Official Site
Jeremy Steding on MySpace
Jeremy Steding on Facebook
Jeremy Steding on Twitter
Jeremy Steding on YouTube

ROBERT EARL KEEN – THE ROSE HOTEL


The first time I ever heard anything referred to as Texas Country it was a song from Robert Earl Keen. That song, unlike many people’s first REK exposure (The Road Goes on Forever), was Corpus Christi Bay. My younger brother played it for me one evening and I was hooked. I speedily acquired REK’s catalog and branched out into other Texas Country artists like Cory Morrow, Pat Green, Jason Boland & The Stragglers just to name a few. I love the Texas Country scene and especially The Firehouse Saloon here in Houston. When I finally got into the music REK was too big a name to be playing the dives I tend to hang out in so I rarely see him play and yet he his music holds a special place in my heart. It may be that he was the first artist in a new genre that I heard but it is more likely that he is just an amazing singer/songwriter.

After a four year hiatus we finally have a new release from Robert Earl Keen. The Rose Hotel may be standard Robert Earl Keen but that doesn’t mean there is anything standard about the album. You see standard Robert Earl Keen is a cut above the rest even when it comes to Texas Country. I have been listening to this thing for two days now and haven’t found a single song I didn’t like. From the opening strokes of The Rose Hotel to the closing chords of Wireless in Heaven this is a solid album. Toss in some a Townes Van Zandt cover Flying Shoes and Billy Bob Thorton doing vocals on 10,000 Chinese Walk Into A Bar and you end up with something great. Fifteen albums into his career Robert Earl Keen proves once again that there is no mold that fits him and that suits us just fine.

If you aren’t already a Robert Earl Keen fan you should be. Give the 9b selections a listen and go get yourself REK’d…

Robert Earl Keen – The Rose Hotel
Robert Earl Keen – Throwin’ Rocks
Robert Earl Keen – The Man Behind The Drums

Robert Earl Keen’s Official Website, Robert Earl Keen on myspace, Buy The Rose Hotel