Former And Current 9B Editors on the Radio

Our very own Wolf was on the radio with former 9B writer and editor Charles Hale this week and this is what it sounded like:

Benchmarks – “American Night” – American Night
Two Cow Garage – “Continental Distance” – Continental Distance
Benjamin Booker – “Have You Seen My Son?” – Benjamin Booker
Adam Faucett – “Rock Ain’t Gold” – Blind Water Finds Blind Water
Gaslight Anthem – “Lonesome Sound” – The ’59 Sound
Kill County – “Straight Six Ford” – The Year Of Getting By
Michael Dean Damron – “Dancing In The Moonlight” – Father’s Day
Shane Sweeney – “Motel Blues” – The Finding Time
Robert Chaney – “The Morning After” – Cracked Picture Frames
Tim Barry – “No News From the North” – Lost & Rootless
Jason Isbell – “Something More Than Free” – Something More Than Free
Doc Dailey & Magnolia Devil – “Waiting On You” – Catch the Presidents
Tyler Childers – “Charleston Girl” – Live At The Red Barn Vol. 1
Aaron Lee Tasjan – “Santa Monica & Vine” – The Thinking Man’s Filth
Arliss Nancy – “Front Seat” – Simple Machines
Langhorne Slim & The Law – “Past lives” – The Way We Move
Lilly Hiatt – “Jesus Would’ve Let Me Pick the Restaurant” – Royal Blue
The Killers – “Leave The Bourbon On The Shelf” – Sawdust
Against Me! – “F*** My Life 666” – Transgender Dysphoria Blues
Austin Lucas – “Alone in Memphis” – Stay Reckless
John Moreland – “Sad Baptist Rain” – High On Tulsa Heat
Barton Carroll – “Every Little Bit Hurts” – Avery County, I’m Bound To You
Jamestown Revival – “revival” – Utah
Matt Woods – “Beating Down My Door” – Matt Woods Manifesto
Cory Branan – “No Hit Wonder” – No Hit Wonder
Glossary – “At midnight” – How We Handle Our Midnights
Lucero – “Hearts On Fire” – Live DVD
Drive By Truckers – “Daddy’s Cup” – The Dirty South
Lee Bains III & the Glory Fires – “Dirt Track” – A Live Show

I’d be lying if I didn’t admit this was an excuse to post Charles’ podcast because it completely rocks and he’s pretty damn awesome. I know I miss his voice in the background of things around here. I’ve added his podcast to “Sites We Read” and hopefully you’ll all subscribe to it. There’s a lot worse things you could do with your time.

An Entire Instagram Dedicated To Making John Moreland Happy

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All of us at 9B and all you reading the site have known for a long time that John Moreland is an amazing songwriter. Around these parts we’re used to not seeing the best out there get any coverage by the MSM, regardless of how good their work is all while watching tripe float to the surface. So it was a little bit of a shock to see one of the absolute best of the best get covered by the Wall Street Journal! That’s not the important part of this article though…

The important thing was finding out about that @cheerupjohnmoreland exists on Instagram. While I’m not sure how I feel about it, according to the article Moreland is fine with it. I’m now following it and you should as well because, well, just because dammit! You can even contribute to the cause by emailing the curator of said account. If you have some random cute pics lying around your hard drive that can’t possibly be cheering John up just sitting there doing nothing then send them along. While it’s nice to see the media coverage of one of our beloved artists it’s even nicer to see someone putting so much effort in to cheering him up!

“My Sins My Own” – A Study of Vanessa Jean Speckman

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“It is most interesting to me,” says Cecelia Jean Speckman, “that she always said she was going to be an artist…and she IS an artist!” She’s speaking of her daughter here, in a breathless amazement that could seem typical of any parent talking about any child. The difference here, however, is that the devotion and commitment with which the mother speaks of the daughter is the same with which the daughter speaks of the art. There’s a clarity of expression here, an ability to be plainspoken and truthful that must surely be genetic. Her brother says the same: “Artists are the folks that can see the beauty in anything and translate that through their medium – it’s something that not everyone can do and Vanessa has found a way to do that.”

This article will be a rough sketch, as it has to be: Vanessa Jean Speckman continues to strive, grow, and learn, much more a tree with many branches than a simpler organism growing only in one direction. The lens through which so many have gotten to know Speckman is a musical one, but music is by no means her starting point or her primary inspiration. Through her family, her peers, and her own words you will get to know a woman whose work has inspired so many in this community.

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The open admiration of her family members is returned wholly in kind. Vanessa Jean Speckman loves and appreciates where she came from. “I was surrounded with art and makers from my earliest memories, so as early as I can remember, it was ‘the norm’.” A grandfather that regularly painted scenes from National Geographic magazines, parents that took her to see Leonard Cohen, a brother that regularly trekked out to shows with her and helped create a zine that influenced the rest of her life.

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The zine was called Lubricated. Speckman was just out of college and had moved in with her older brother Patrick, but was less than thrilled with the lack of community spirit in the Bay Area. “…everyone around me seemed to be straddling what they were, and what they thought we were supposed to be and I saw all this cool stuff in between that I wanted to celebrate. That there didn’t have to be any lines crossed or boxes to be put in.” The zine was about more than music, it was a way of connecting what burned brightest across all mediums: music, visual art, poetry, film. In Patrick’s words, the “common thread was creativity.”

“I was a high school art teacher and 6th and 7th grade English teacher,” Speckman says, “driving to shows every night, painting in my garage and staying up way too late making Lubricated…It was this really organic and beautiful process that took on a life of its own, that I don’t think either of us ever had imagined.”

11021068_10203536113474627_3728400290139592760_nLubricated introduced Vanessa to many like-minded people, including Michael Dean Damron of I Can Lick Any Sonofabitch In The House. “I was touring with Two Cow Garage,” Damron said, “and [Speckman] was doing a zine at the time and came down to talk. The next night we all played in San Jose and she gave us a place to crash and some kick ass Mexican food…One of the kindest, warmest people I had ever met.” And just as the music influenced Speckman, her art influenced the artists around her. Speckman painted the cover of Mike D’s recent solo album When The Darkness Come. “…it was the perfect combination of darkness and my childhood,” Damron said. “I related instantly.”

tumblr_ne8565B2HQ1rvtjh6o1_500Being more than willing to travel up and down the West Coast for shows, plans not being a necessity (for reference see her painted suitcases: ‘Gotta Run!’, and ‘…Can’t Stay!’), there are plenty of stories like the following. Frank Turner, when asked how he met Speckman, said, “Many years back, on the road, through road friends. We used to stay at her place in Northen California when we were on tour.” Vanessa recently contributed a print that was included with Frank’s compilation album ‘The Third Three Years’. The piece features many of Frank’s standby references and inspirations but in Speckman’s particular style. Lyrics have a habit of sliding out of songs and into reality, tattoos are almost too honest, and most figures are bearing quiet witness to their circumstances, looking out at the audience or down at their feet with similar melancholy self-awareness.

10628428_10152400087671325_191840535498871182_nBrandon Barnett of Ghost Shirt, another band Vanessa painted an album cover for, put it as follows: “Vanessa’s art is so direct…She can make you feel all your feelings with 4-5 words spray painted on an old map.” The album cover, featuring a defiant boy (with plenty of tattoos) braving rough seas in a boat also bearing a scythe-wielding Grim Reaper. Barnett: “If the record has a unifying theme it would be something about not looking for well-being, love, or salvation outside yourself. I never told Vanessa this. The first thing I noticed on the art was a little cartoon flag being waved from a boat that just said ‘Save Yourself’. I completely lost it.” Speckman is undoubtedly an artist who understands artists, who creates work not just for artists, but that artists will appreciate.

As previously written, however, there are many branches to Speckman’s artistic life and music is just one of them. Her artistic story has been one of constant change and growth, new mediums and themes emerging as old ones are thoroughly explored. “I don’t ever want to be stuck making the same thing with the same tools – that would be my own personal purgatory,” says Speckman. “I love that I am my own tool in the shed and it’s up to me to learn and develop and stay sharp.” In school she painted with oils and sculpted with clay, and after college she didn’t do much art other than “bastard stubborn photography” and the zine. What soon emerged, though, was a talent for re-purposing or re-imagining existing forms. Maps were a common vehicle for communicating Speckman’s melancholy and wanderlust.

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Speckman’s art seems to be about the medium just as much as the message, whether it’s a cheap plastic compass with “nobody at the wheel” on its back or a matchbook with “i just have a lot of feelings” sewn to it. These simple pieces, a common item and a few words, are also some of her strongest. “I don’t think musicians or artist create a piece in hopes to dictate something, rather to spark something,” Speckman says. A keychain tucked into your bag with another purchase, a notebook with the reminder “we’ll never get out alive” pasted to it, a map saying “we don’t need a map”…all of it is easy to see, to understand on a surface level, but there’s also somewhere to go. Her art is a starting point, and often one that starts you off very abruptly.

There’s something refreshing about saying exactly what you’re thinking, and Speckman’s work embraces those hard truths. “I suppose I try to aggressively gain the viewer’s attention right off the bat, but then I hope that it makes them come back to self reflect on it.” Perhaps the most aggressive of her works are the bummer Valentines, vintage love notes that Speckman updates with feelings and thoughts that are just as powerful and present on V-Day as love is.

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Other truths, often aggressively vulnerable, come painted onto the t-shirts that Speckman makes. Her “Dear rock’n’roll, you can’t break my heart, XO me” has become a favorite for touring musicians to wear onstage and in music videos. There’s nothing ironic or cynical about the statement: being a musician is hard for a long time before it gets easy, and these are people spitting in the face of adversity to do what they love. This is true for all artists across all mediums, for the ones that refuse to back down from a challenging life. In Speckman’s words: “Art is not a means to an end for me.  Art is a means to living for me.  The fact that I currently support myself as an artist, is something that does not get lost upon me or is ever unappreciated.  But art and art as a career are two different things and I am on the side of the first, not the latter.”

It can’t be easy, constantly creating and making so that you can create and make further, but difficulty doesn’t necessarily come with unpleasantness. One element of Speckman’s life is constant touring, either solo or with her partner Micah Schnabel. While touring is a whirlwind no matter who you are, it’s also slightly different for visual artists than performers. “Did I make enough t-shirts? Did I bring enough variety in my art and in my prices? [There’s] this feeling of incomplete completion upon leaving.” But there’s plenty to enjoy about the life as well. The newness of each town, the unease at not knowing where to get your next cup of coffee and the feeling of having conquered the world when you take your first sip: these are all feelings that Speckman lives for. “There’s too much to do and see to be too comfortable doing the same thing every day.”

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Comfort plays a role in her art as well; or rather, the lack thereof. Whether it’s the word ‘FUCK’ emblazoned on a t-shirt, an unapologetic refutation of normal life emblazoned on a map, or a girl holding a Popsicle frozen around a knife out from her crotch, Speckman sets out to make the viewer uneasy. “I like the topical sweetness upon first look,” Speckman says, “and part two hopes to make you uncomfortably comfortable.” All art is the expression of human emotion through some medium, and Speckman’s chosen form of expression is to say what we’re all thinking. In the words of Schnabel, “When you find an artist that makes you think, ‘That’s exactly how I feel! Why didn’t I write that! Why didn’t I think of that!’ it is really something special. It’s challenging and inspiring. Which is what art is all about.”

Everyone in Speckman’s carefully and carelessly drawn/painted/written world is on the same page: the wires are visible, the boom mic is in the shot, there are ordinary cruelties whipping by like storm winds, and her characters stand gazing out at it all. They represent her audience, each of them individually, and this real world is no less cruel. There’s the hope, though, that strength can be drawn from everyone’s own unapologetic observations of the world around them, that maybe honesty of the heart and not just the mouth could get us through all of this. Though the world that Speckman conjures with her words and paints is sometimes bleak, it is never without hope. Like the little boy in the boat, defiantly sailing with Death alongside him, we all have to save ourselves. In the words of one of Speckman’s heroes, the punk rock heroine Patti Smith, “Jesus died for somebody’s sins, but not mine.”

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You can check out Vanessa Jean Speckman’s Tumblr, her Instagram page, and see more of her work at her Etsy.

Mixtape: "Hole Dozer"

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So I’ve been working a lot lately, and thinking about work. I’m too exhausted to put much thought into this post, so I’m not going to. I have a lot of feelings about work, and you can find a lot of them in this mixtape.

It has a lot of stuff I really love: starts out with a rare Lucero track, has some live Lee Bains III, good ol’ Tim Barry, and is (I believe) the Ninebullets debut of a little-known artist named Kanye West.

Give it a listen and let me know what you like to have in your ears at work. For me it’s audiobooks, rock operas, and the constant needling of my own self-doubt.

I want to get more into making mixtapes for folks, and maybe podcasting in the manner of our very own Charles Hale’s Ajax Diner Book Club. So here’s a taste of what I bring to the table, pun from mixing metaphors neither intended nor appreciated.

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Hole Dozer Mixtape Track Listing

1. “The Bridge” – Lucero

2. “Last Of The Working Slobs” – The Von Erichs

3. “Saturday Night – Two Cow Garage

4. “Mutiny” – William Elliot Whitmore

5.  “Save Your Money for the Weekend” – Glossary

6.  “Spaceship” – Kanye West (feat. GLC & Consequence)

7. “Ne’er Do Wells” – Audra Mae

8. “Sweat & Cigarettes” – John Moreland

9. “Moonshiner” – SCORPIOS

10. “Avoiding Catatonic Surrender” – Tim Barry

11. “Br00tal” – Drag The River

12. “A Company Town” – Matt Woods

13. “Five O’Clock World” – The Vogues

14. “Four Score And Seven” – Titus Andronicus

15. “Dirt Track (Live on WFMU)” – Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires

Ajax Diner Book Club 4/27/15 KRFC Ft. Collins CO

Jon Dee Graham “Beautifully Broken” from Not As Bad As It Looks

J. Roddy Walston & The Business “Marigold” from Essential Tremors

Blue Blood “This Is The Life” from This Is The Life

Cafeteria “Gorgeous Friend” from Knee Deep

James McMurtry “These Things I’ve Come to Know” from Complicated Game

Spirit Family Reunion “All the Way Back Home” from Hands Together

Slim Cessna’s Auto Club “No doubt about it” from Unentitled

Low Anthem “Cage The Songbird” from Oh My God Charlie Darwin

Mississippi John Hurt “I Shall Not Moved” from Best of Mississippi John Hurt

John Moreland “Cherokee” from High On Tulsa Heat

Kris Kristofferson “Me And Bobbie McGhee” from Live From Austin TX

Scott H. Biram “I’m Troubled” from Nothin’ But Blood

Arlo McKinley & The Lonesome Sound “Just Like The Rest” from Arlo McKinley & The Lonesome Sound

Townes Van Zandt “No Place To Fall” from Be Here To Love Me

Drag the River “Here’s to the Losers” from Drag The River

Big Mama Thornton “Cotton Picking Blues”

Supremes “Having A Party” from Sings Sam Cooke

Howlin’ Wolf “spoonful” from His Best

Patti Smith “break It Up” from Horses

Courtney Barnett “An Illustration Of Loneliness” from Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit

Sour Boy Bitter Girl “Flowers” from The Days After The Fire

Meat Puppets “Good Golly Miss Molly” from Out My Way

Brown Bird “Sackcloth and Ash” from Axis Mundi

Elmore James “Ice Cream Man” from Blues Masters: The Best of Elmore James

Two Cow Garage “Soundtrack to My Summer” from Sweet Saint Me

Replacements “Shooting Dirty Pool” from Pleased to Meet Me

 

John Moreland – High On Tulsa Heat – 2015

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Inside John Moreland’s High On Tulsa Heat he writes “This is a record about home. Whatever that is.” and if he had written a similar inscription for 2013’s In The Throes I believe it would have said “This is a record about faith. Whatever that is.” and that is the only comparison I plan to make of those two records in this review. Gone are most of the biblical and religious references and undertones, here they are replaced with elements from the natural world and of people. The ache is there, hung both in Moreland’s voice and in his subtle guitar playing, but so is the beauty.

I’ve been accused of writing too intellectually about music on several occasions and I understand where that criticism comes from. I believe that Moreland’s songwriting belongs in the conversations about the highest examples of the art form and that his craftsmanship and selection of detail have his work on the way to being regarded with masters with names like Van Zandt and Kristofferson. Work like he’s creating is worthy of being written about in intellectual terms and I hope I’m the person to write that story when the time comes. But today I just want to talk about why these songs matter.

I’ve known sadness in the past and know I’ll be visited by it again someday. Chances are that if you’ve latched on to Moreland’s music in the last few years that sadness has also been a companion in your life. The beauty that Moreland is able to express through his saddest songs is the idea that we aren’t alone in these moments. The songs, Moreland’s and the other greats, are there even when we don’t need them just to remind us that they will be when our midnights are too dark to handle.

The longing jumps out of the speakers in the opening “Hang Me In The Tulsa County Stars” and it’s clear that Moreland has truly found his voice as a writer. He gets to the point quickly with the line “My heart is growing heavy from the ever endless hurt” and later “make you homesick for a home you never had/ burning out the good with all the bad.” But an important shift happens when it becomes clear that the song is really about being there for someone else in their trying time not about dwelling on yourself. There are many lines in the second half of the song that talk about being there, being there for that one other person that matters most. I don’t understand every lyric but I want to keep listening while I hope the meaning presents itself. There’s hope in “Hang Me In The Tulsa County Stars,” you have to listen for it but when you hear it you can feel what I like to call Moreland Beauty.

Following on the heels of such a weighty opener, Moreland eases up a bit with “Heart’s Too Heavy.” A full band song that’s catchy as hell, “Heart’s Too Heavy” proves that Moreland isn’t stuck making a follow up and is willing to balance the power his songs wield on both electric and acoustic guitars.

As with any Moreland album there’s line after line in song after song that warrants a mention in a review but there are just too many here and I’m trying my best to not be an intellectual. Instead, I think it’s important to mention the vulnerability expressed in these ten songs. Though probably frightening and nerve-racking to write and perform, the vulnerability most likely leads to a sense of power for Moreland and gives us listeners a sense of calm. Along with the craftsmanship, the vulnerability is what draws people so intensely to Moreland’s songs. You don’t have to try to explain things to yourself when Moreland has already expressed it for you.

By the time the album reaches the landmark “You Don’t Care For Me Enough To Cry,” the balance of band and solo songs on High On Tulsa Heat allows for casual and intense listening. But “You Don’t Care For Me Enough To Cry” is the type of song that demands full attention. Every element of High On Tulsa Heat and John Moreland as a songwriter is wrapped up in four minutes and fourteen seconds. There’s the natural world, longing for home and someone else. There’s the admission of mistakes made and a willingness to try to be better for the sake of someone else. There’s hope and despair in the same breath with equal parts self-loathing and frankness about limitations. Even if this was the only song on High On Tulsa Heat the album would be ESSENTIAL LISTENING but there truly are ten exceptional songs here.

As I was listening and thinking about writing this review a quote from one of my favorite fiction writers got stuck in my mind. Harry Crews writes some of the most brutal fiction I’ve ever read. He puts his character’s vulnerability on full display and at the same time shows us our own. It’s a quote that I carried in my wallet for years and I think it helps explain what it’s like to be a writer and why people respond so passionately to Moreland’s music. He seems to do it to himself in song so we don’t have to.

You continually pick at yourself, the little sores that you have. They scab over and you pick them open again. Other people not only let them scab over, they let them scar over. They leave it alone. Writers don’t do that. They can’t keep their fingers out of the sore. They’ve got to keep it bleeding. And it’s off that blood that they make their stuff.”

Hang Me in the Tulsa County Stars

Heart’s Too Heavy

You Don’t Care For Me Enough to Cry

Official Site, On Facebook, Buy High On Tulsa Heat

[Playlist] Ninebullets Radio – 09.20.2014 – 88.5FM WMNF Tampa

We did the damn thing. If you wanna hear it, put your ears on the archive of the show.

Below is the playlist for September 20, 2014 [Artist – Song (Album)]

01. Drive-By Truckers – Zip City (Southern Rock Opera)
02. Jason Isbell – Cover Me Up (Southeastern)
03. Parker Millsap – Old Time Religion (Parker Millsap)
04. Otis Gibbs – The Darker Side Of Me (Souvenirs Of A Misspent Youth)
05. Two Cow Garage – Swingset Assassin (Speaking In Cursive)
06. Have Gun Will Travel – Take Me Home, Alice (Fiction, Fact or Folktale!)
07. The Takers – Friends in Bottles (Taker Easy)
08. Matt Woods – Deadman’s Blues (With Love From Brushy Mountain)
09. Big Shoals – 12 Steps (Still Go On)
10. American Aquarium – Burn. Flicker. Die. (Burn. Flicker. Die.)
11. Will Quinlan and The Diviners – Acrimony Blues (Navasota)
12. Sturgill Simpson – The Promise (Metamodern Sounds In Country Music)
13. Arlo McKinely & The Lonesome Sound – Sad Country Song (Arlo McKinely & The Lonesome Sound)
14. Kierston White – Love Songs (Don’t Write Love Songs)
15. Chuck Ragan – Vagabond (Till Midnight)
16. Doc Dailey & Magnolia Devil – She Has Her Moments (Catch The Presidents)
17. McDougall – Ready, Begin (A Few Towns More)
18. John Mellencamp – The Brass Ring (Plain Spoken)
19. Willie Nelson – The Songwriters (Band Of Brothers)
20. John Moreland – Gospel (In The Throes)
21. Nikki Lane – Right Time (All Or Nothin’)
22. The Wind + The Wave – From The Wreckage Build A Home (From The Wreckage)
23. Hiss Golden Messenger – Southern Grammar (Lateness of Dancers)
24. Ben Stalets – Don’t Call Me Lonely (Dear Golden)
25. David Mayfield – Rain On My Parade (Strangers)
26. Becky Warren – Off My Back (The Iraq EP)
27. Adult Boys Thunderband – Mothers Love Me (Abducted Again)

Bold = Request

Ninebullets Radio on Facebook
You can stream Ninebullets Radio here
You can download Ninebullets Radio here: Hour 1 / Hour 2
If you like Ninebullets Radio please drop a 5 spot in the Tip Jar.

P.S.: If you like this show, do me a favor and post about it on your Facebook/Twitter/Blog. It’ll do a lot to help these bands reach new ears…and in the end, that’s what this is all about. It’ll also help bring the existence of the radio show to more people’s attention & the more people there are listening/paying attention to the show the more likely it is to stay on the air.

Episode 193: aired 09.20.2014

[Playlist] Ajax Diner Book Club – 9/8/14 – KRFC Ft. Collins CO

R.L. Burnside “Going Down South” from A Ass Pocket of Whiskey

Black Keys “Brooklyn Bound” from The Big Come Up

Frank Black and the Catholics “Nadine” from Nadine

Shane Sweeney “Legion” from The Finding Time

Jenny Owen Youngs “Last Person” from An Unwavering Band of Light

Billy Joe Shaver “The Git Go” from Long In the Tooth

Lucero “The Last Song” from Live From Atlanta

Devil Makes Three “Old Number Seven” from Devil Makes Three

Kierston White “Happy Noon Beers” from Don’t Write Love Songs

John Moreland “Nobody Gives A Damn About Songs Anymore” from In The Throes

Deer Tick “Unwed Fathers” from Broken Hearts and Dirty Windows

[Playlist] Ninebullets Radio – 09.06.2014 – 88.5FM WMNF Tampa

We did the damn thing. If you wanna hear it, put your ears on the archive of the show.

Below is the playlist for September 06, 2014 [Artist – Song (Album)]

01. Frank Turner – I Still Believe (England Keep My Bones)
02. Chuck Ragan – Vagabond (Till Midnight)
03. Cory Branan – Sour Mash (The No-Hit Wonder)
04. Tyler Childers and High Wall – Deadman’s Curve (Live At Red Barn Radio)
05. Justin Townes Earle – Wanna Be A Stranger (Single Mothers)
06. Chris Knight – Down the River (A Pretty Good Guy)
07. Joe Sundell – Mr. Z (The Hat Thief)
08. Joe Pug – Downbound Train (Deadman’s Town: A Tribute To Born In The USA)
09. Valerie June – Workin’ Woman Blues (Pushin’ Against A Stone)
10. Jason Isbell – Now That Your Dollar Bills Have Sprouted Wings (Beck’s Song Reader)
11. The Decemberists – Rox In The Box (The King Is Dead)
12. Benjamin Booker – Wicked Waters (Benjamin Booker)
13. The Gaslight Anthem – Rollin’ and Tumblin’ (Get Hurt)
14. Matt Woods – Ain’t No Living (With Love From Brushy Mountain)
15. The Takers – Friends in Bottles (Taker Easy)
16. Big Shoals – 12 Steps (Still Go On)
17. American Gun – Rock and Roll Won (Promised Youth)
18. Pine Hill Haints – Galaxy Buffalo (The Magik Sounds Of The Pine Hill Haints)
19. Dos Ringos – Long Time (Dos Ringos)
20. Lucero – I’ll Just Fall (Live From Atlanta)
21. The Wind + The Wave – Raising Hands Raising Hell Raise ‘Em High (From The Wreckage)
22. David Mayfield – Rain On My Parade (Strangers)
23. John Moreland – Blacklist (In The Throes)
24. Arlo McKinley & The Lonesome Sound – This Damn Town (Self-Titled)
25. Snakehealers – Roadside (Cure All)
26. Shooter Jennings – Don’t Wait Up (I’m Playin’ Possum) (Don’t Wait Up For George)
27. Justin Payne – Gettin’ By (No Place Lower Than High)
28. Whitey Morgan and the 78’s – I Ain’t Drunk (Whitey Morgan and the 78’s)
29. William Elliot Whitmore – Johnny Law (Animals In The Dark)

Bold = Request

Ninebullets Radio on Facebook
You can stream Ninebullets Radio here
You can download Ninebullets Radio here: Hour 1 / Hour 2
If you like Ninebullets Radio please drop a 5 spot in the Tip Jar.

P.S.: If you like this show, do me a favor and post about it on your Facebook/Twitter/Blog. It’ll do a lot to help these bands reach new ears…and in the end, that’s what this is all about. It’ll also help bring the existence of the radio show to more people’s attention & the more people there are listening/paying attention to the show the more likely it is to stay on the air.

Episode 191: aired 09.06.2014

[Playlist] Ninebullets Radio – 08.16.2014 – 88.5FM WMNF Tampa

Local talent and female fronted bands are heavily featured on this show. Some other bad ass shit too so put your ears on the archive of the show.

Below is the playlist for August 0916, 2014 [Artist – Song (Album)]

01. Drag The River – Old Sad Songs
02. Valerie June – Workin’ Woman Blues (Pushin’ Against A Stone)
03. Becky Warren – Off My Back (The Iraq EP)
04. Kierston White – Alcohol (Don’t Write Love Songs)
05. Lucero – Drink Till We’re Gone (Live From Atlanta)
06. Big Shoals – Skipping Stones (Still Go On)
07. Joseph Huber – Two Tongued Swear (The Hanging Road)
08. Willie Nelson – Hard to Be an Outlaw (Band Of Brothers)
09. Jason Isbell – Elephant (Southeastern)
10. Andrew Combs – Month Of Bad Habits
11. John R Miller – M.O.T.E. (Service Engine)
12. Matt Woods – Sunshine (Broken Strings & Beer Specials)
13. American Aquarium – Casualties (Burn.Flicker.Die)
14. The Wind + The Wave – Raising Hands Raising Hell Raise ‘Em High (From The Wreckage)
15. St. Paul and the Broken Bones – Half the City (Half The City)
16. Nikki Lane – Right Time (All Or Nothin’)
17. NQ Arbuckle – Hospitals (Future Happens Anyway)
18. The Gaslight Anthem – Rollin’ & Tumblin’ (Get Hurt)
19. The Holy Ghost Electric Show – Surprise (The Great American Holy Ghost Electric Show)
20. Glossary – save your money for the weekend (Feral Fire)
21. Those Crosstown Rivals – Six Strings (Hell and Back)
22. Arliss Nancy – Troubadour (Wild American Runners)
23. Benjamin Booker – Wicked Waters (Benjamin Booker)
24. The Woolly Bushmen – Screamin’ ana’ Shoutin’ (Sky Bosses)
25. Dos Ringos – Long Time (Dos Ringos)
26. John Moreland – Gospel (In The Throes)
27. Micah Schnabel – American Static (When The Stage Lights Dim)
28. Roadkill Ghost Choir – Down & Out
29. Sturgill Simpson – Living The Dream (Metamodern Sounds In Country Music)
30. Parker Millsap – Truck Stop Gospel (Parker Millsap)

Bold = Request

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P.S.: If you like this show, do me a favor and post about it on your Facebook/Twitter/Blog. It’ll do a lot to help these bands reach new ears…and in the end, that’s what this is all about. It’ll also help bring the existence of the radio show to more people’s attention & the more people there are listening/paying attention to the show the more likely it is to stay on the air.

Episode 188: aired 08.16.2014