Clutch: From Beale Street to Oblivion

This cd goes straight to the Essential Listening list!

A lot of the people I hang around with have lost interest in Clutch. They contend the band has lost its edge. I am not of that camp. I believe that Clutch fully realized their potential with 2004’s Blast Tyrant and rate Blast Tyrant, Robot Hive: Exodus and their newest effort From Beale Street to Oblivion (March 27 release) as the three best albums of their career. With Beale Street, Clutch finally stops flirting with the bluesy Southern rock sound, and embraces it fully.

Neil Fallon’s trademark deep voice is as preacher-like as ever, and his lyrical pen has not dulled one bit. Personally, I think his humor really shines through on “When Vegans Attack”. As an aside: is it me or does the opening guitar riff sound like “Lil’ Devil” from The Cult album Electric?

Beale Street leaked to the internets waaaaaayyyyy back in February, so I was able to listen to it every day I was on my recent ski trip. I constantly found myself asking: “Is this Clutch’s best album ever?” It might just be. Beale Street is definitely their most consistent effort from start to finish. They way they have embraced blues riffs and blues keys … I have to say “yes”, despite the haterade of my friends. I love this fucking CD. There is zero doubt that I am adding it to my essential listening list. Starting right now Beale Street is not only my favorite album of Clutch’s fifteen year career, so far, it is my favorite album of 2007. Do yourself a favor: If you are a fan of …. oh, just get the album!

I recently got to see Clutch live for the first time ever @ The State Theater in downtown St. Petersburg. I wasn’t really a Clutch fan until Blast Tyrant came along, so I passed on a number of opportunities to see them previously. Sidenote #2: I have had tickets to shows that were cancelled due to hurricanes before… welcome to Florida I guess.

I wish I could tell you all kinds of things about their show, but I can’t. See, the show was at a venue I can walk to, and stumble from. Bad News. The whiskey poured *really* freely at the 5th Street compound before the show, so most of the details are, as you might imagine … lost.

I can tell you I pretty much loved it.

I’m not a head banger due to the simple fact that I keep the dome shaved … so in lieu of banging the head I stomp my foot. My heel hurt for days after that show. If I qualified as professional reporter I wouldn’t get that trashed before a show, but I ain’t. I am a professional drunk who happens to love good music and has a web site so sometimes you get the “great show, but can’t remember shit” review.

Clutch – Power Player
Clutch – The Devil and Me
Clutch – Electric Worry

Clutch Official Site; Clutch on MySpace; Buy Clutch’s new CD: From Beale Street to Oblivion

4 thoughts on “Clutch: From Beale Street to Oblivion”

  1. the new album kicks butt……… form start to finish…….. clutch will never die!!!!!!

  2. other bands wish they could put out quality rock and blues like this, and coming from a blues/rock influence background (though im into nothing but progressive/metal/death at this point) this cd is absolutely fucking brilliant.

    People who hate this cd dont understand real music anyway, so just shrug your shoulders to them, salute, and realize you’ve got better taste in music than them.

    Period.

    -Edubs

  3. I went to see them at the London Astoria gig on Easter Sunday, and it rocked – predictably. Only Clutch can make the word ‘predictably’ sound exciting. I missed the support acts due to the gig starting at 5:30pm (and ending at 10:20pm for fuck’s sake) and had a couple of pints and a joint at the pub before going in – a magic fucking formula, may I say?!
    I brought two Clutch virgins (who had looked at and listened via the website alone). When they looked at each other and started nodding during the first song, it was pretty satisfying – another successful conversion to the Clutch cult!
    I am so happy with the new album that I am going to go out and buy it ASAP (something I find it hard to do due to brutal economic circumstances).

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